Category Archives: Master Plan Elements

Final Public Art Questionnaire for West Palm Beach

QUESTIONNAIRE:  Before the public art meeting on Wednesday,  please take the final questionnaire on public art locations and ideas.

Click Here for Final Questionnaire.
Click Here for Final Questionnaire.

PUBLIC ART SITES ON GOOGLE MAP:  Before Wednesday evening, please check out the Google Map with locations of existing art, possible future art sites and major private developments.

West Palm Beach Google Public Art Map
West Palm Beach Google Public Art Map
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Send Us your Ideas and Locations for Public Art Projects

Sloss Design
Sloss Design

Forward to your friends!   For the April 22, 2015, Community Meeting on the AiPP Master Plan, please send us your ideas to ibiARTwestpalm@gmail.com.  We will add them to the discussion list next week and post them online.

All this week new ideas will be posted with a summary distributed and chance to vote in a survey in Monday and Tuesday next week. Ideas to be posted this week:  Artist in Residence in a Neighborhood, Ann Norton Sculpture, Art on Quadrille at new downtown train station, Art in Parks, Culturally Diverse Artworks, Bi-annual “submit your idea for public art” competition, etc, etc…..

Below are the ideas already posted online.

Ideas for New Development

Sustainable / Eco Art
Parking Garage Facades
Building Entrances
Health and Exercise
Building Tops

Locations

Gateways
City Park at new Major League Baseball Facility
In the Intracoastal on the Waterfront Downtown
Move the Henry Rolf Sculpture
Giant Mural on Railroad Track Parking Garage

Specific Projects

Remake Augusta Savage Sculpture “The Harp”
Troll under the Bridge
Bring Back Lost Signs from WPB Past
George Gershwin at Tri-Rail Station
Large Paintings or Murals of WPB families and groups
Purchase work by longtime WPB artists

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Public Art Survey Results

For IBI Group, consulting art researcher Surale Phillips completed the public art survey for the master plan in February.  689 people completed the online public art survey for the City of West Palm Beach.   Phillips used the result from the 406 people who self-declared themselves residents of West Palm Beach,  but the results are nearly the same with employees and visitors included.

Pleas view the slideshow that was presented at the March, 2015, Art in Public Places Committee meeting.   Please remember that the survey is not “scientific” as people volunteered for the survey and in this case, 90% really enjoy art.

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From the survey, we constructed a draft mission statement and goals related to expressed priorities.

The Art in Public Places program should beautify the city through timeless, beautiful and meaningful sculptures, gardens and murals in parks, downtown, waterfront and entrances to the city.

The future artworks should inspire creativity, bring delight to everyday spaces, support local artists, promote pride, attract and entertain tourists to our city, and reflect the city’s many cultures and lifestyles.

When appropriate, the art should be fun and colorful and  artists should improve blank walls, vacant lots and plazas

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The survey both reflects and deviates from national opinions.  Parks, downtowns and entrances are frequently preferred locations and beauty the goal.  The lack of interest for artworks in neighborhoods or that reinforce neighborhood identity is unusual.  Vacant lots, blank walls and supporting local artists are higher than normal.

Generally, people understand public art as sculptures, murals and functional artworks, but gardens are higher than normal.   Street art, changing art and interactive artwork are newer ideas that have support.

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The public art surveys produces some challenges to the program.

1.  Work that is beautiful and meaningful, but not traditional modern art nor representational art.

2.  Work that is excellent, innovative and attracts tourists, but not necessarily made by artists of international renown.

3.  Work made by local artists from a range cultural backgrounds, but without a priority to benefit local neighborhoods.